The End Of Empty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don’t know if you have ever thought about it like this, but need is what defines life here on planet earth.

In fact, time itself is the father of need. The universe was created as finite, meaning there is a beginning and an end. In a finite reality, need is the principle in which time exists, it’s the skeleton upon which reality hangs.

“Need is the final singular truth by which our world operates. While need is the very substance of our existence, it has no place in God’s reality. And if God is love, then you could say it like this: need cannot exist in love. Need is actually counter to the nature of love. Love trumps every need, every time. It’s the good news that only gets better.”

(click to tweet)

Need is the final singular truth by which our world operates. Humanity exists inside the confines of need. We trade in the currency of need. It is the foundational structure of our DNA. It’s the defining core value of our very existence. You could say that we are slaves to need.

Need is with us when we wake and when we sleep. And it’s not an abstract idea. It’s probably the most real thing many of us know. It’s an absolute, a physical, emotional, and spiritual reality woven into the very fabric of our existence.

For instance, we need air to breathe and we need gravity to keep us from floating away. We need food to sustain our bodies. We need clothes and shelter. We need money to buy clothes and shelter. We need jobs to make money so we can buy clothes and shelter. We need a good economy to provide jobs.

What I am trying to communicate is that we are one big walking, talking, breathing, need.

It’s not a bad thing. It’s actually beautifully brilliant if seen from God’s perspective. He created it. And because God is good, He only has good ideas and only creates good things. I believe God created need for one reason: to reveal His love. But I’m getting a little ahead of myself.

So creation took its first breath in the wonderful certainty of need. Our heavenly Father created a finite reality in which men and women dwell. And then He did something odd and absolutely amazing, He breathed His Spirit, His Neuma into us. He put eternal spirits in finite bodies. He introduced the immeasurable into a world controlled by measurements. He made humankind in His image—Love.

God is love and He is always good. It says so in my Bible. And yours too.

Love is the beginning and the end, and everything in between, and everything before and everything after. Love is infinite, immeasurable.

Love is complete. Love is the answer, not the question. Love is always good. That’s all in the Book as well.

“There is a revelation of love available to every one of us that settles the insecurity of need, that sets us free to become sons and daughters of a perfectly good, perfectly loving, heavenly Father.”

(click to tweet)

Now here’s my crazy thought. While need is the very substance of our existence, it has no place in God’s reality. And if God is love, then you could say it like this: need cannot exist in love. Need is actually counter to the nature of love. Love trumps every need, every time. It’s the good news that only gets better.

I would like to suggest that need fosters insecurity, while love cultivates identity. Stick with me, I think I’m on to something big here. I believe there is a revelation of love available to every one of us that settles the insecurity of need, that sets us free to become sons and daughters of a perfectly good, perfectly loving, heavenly Father.

Before Jesus’s resurrection, we lived in a world where every emotion, every decision, and every moment was defined by need, by what we didn’t have and needed or what we would need later on.

After Jesus’s resurrection, our heavenly Father invited humanity to live free of the controls of need in a glorious infinite revelation—Love. The core value of our very existence was redeemed from a need-based reality to an intimate, measureless love relationship.

Jesus came and revealed the Father. He took all of our needs upon Himself and died. He took a need-based existence to the grave where it always belonged. And upon His resurrection, He introduced us to a greater revelation of intimacy with our heavenly Father, and access to the infinite reality of His Kingdom of love—heaven on earth.

What would it look like if we began to live with a greater revelation of Love?

I bet we would look a little more like Jesus…


Jason Clark
is a writer, speaker and lead communicator at A Family Story ministries. His mission is to encourage sons and daughters to grow sure in the love of an always-good heavenly Father. He and his wife, Karen, live in North Carolina with their three children.

2 Comments

  1. Brent

    Brent (brlokker@gmail.com)

    So good, Jason! This insightful post reminds me of Psalm 23:1:
    “You, Lord, are my shepherd. I will never be in need.” (CEV)

    Or, “The Lord is my shepherd. I will always have everything I need.” (ERV)

    Or, one of my new favorite versions: “The Lord is my best friend and my shepherd. I always have more than enough.” (TPT)
    Let’s all experience the deeper places of love and security in Jesus!

    Reply
    • Jason Clark

      I love this! “I always have more than enough.” That is the truth regardless of what we experience, wow, love The Passion Version!

      Reply

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