When the Veil Gets Lifted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let me tell you how it is between my wife and me.

We could be driving down the road or sitting on the couch watching Super Store when suddenly I am gripped with a revelation of how amazing Karen is. I will remember how she was so patient with our kids earlier in the day, or how she just made me coffee and I didn’t even ask for it and it was the perfect mix of coffee, cream, and sugar. Or how stunning the back of her neck is.
I will turn to her and say that simple universal phrase—“I love you”—to which she always responds, “I love you too, gorgeous.”

But sometimes in these unveiled moments I’ll stop what I’m doing and say, “Karen, I’m feeling it right now! At this exact moment, I am having a revelation of my love for you! My heart, mind, and soul are loving you right now.”

“Right this instant?” She asks, her eyes bright.

“Yes, this exact moment.”

“Wow.” She smiles. “Now I’m feeling it too!”

Often this interaction is followed by an encounter . . . That is to say, there might be a shared smile or a hug, a kiss, or— Well, that’s none of your business.

I believe revelation, in the context of a love relationship, always leads to a greater love encounter, a greater intimacy. In fact, that’s the whole point of revelation. Karen and I have been married twenty-four years. We know that we love each other, we say it all the time, we decide to all the time. But these moments of revelation are priceless. They are birthed of a pure surrender one to another, where everything in the universe aligns and our hearts, minds, and souls experience the encounter. In these moments, nothing else matters! In these moments, the truth of our love is purely revealed and is always deepened.

I am convinced that when it comes to our relationship with God, revelation is meant to lead to a greater encounter. Revelation means “to remove the veil,” it’s about discovering what has always been there, it’s always about knowing in greater measure the love of God. I am also convinced that there is always more.


Jason Clark
is a writer, speaker and lead communicator at A Family Story ministries. His mission is to encourage sons and daughters to grow sure in the love of an always-good heavenly Father. He and his wife, Karen, live in North Carolina with their three children.

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