1 Corinthians 13 is one of the most beautiful descriptions of love, a chapter often used at weddings. So, most of us are familiar.

The chapter describes love as patient and kind and continues by laying out the stunning attributes of God. Tucked between “Love isn’t easily angered” and “Love doesn’t delight in evil” is a powerful world-changing truth:

“Love keeps no record of wrongs….”

Jesus, Love in human form, hanging on a cross between heaven and earth, His body battered, the lie of separation a veil between Him and His Father, the myth of abandonment cutting Him off from sensing His Father’s affection; the fiction that God punishes screaming its message through the iron nails that tore His flesh and held Him fast to a cross, reveals the power of a free will submitted to love.

Jesus—fully God, fully Man, one with Father, intimate with Holy Spirit—forgives. And His forgiveness confronts the transactional, sin-counting, retributive justice payment system—“What seems right to a man.” (1)

Casting back to before the beginning and looking forward to after the end, Jesus keeps no record of the wrong humanity has committed. “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do,” He said. And the power of that Greater Love saves the world.

Do you know what happened when Jesus kept no record of our wrongs?

He couldn’t justify His right to hold onto offense—and all creation was reborn in that powerful conclusion.

And we’ve been invited to live in that same powerfully transformative freedom!

All creation has been invited to awaken to that reconciling measureless revelation. Love doesn’t count sins; it keeps no record of wrong!

(1) Proverbs 14:12

This article is excerpted from my book, Leaving and Finding Jesus
Order Now At AMAZON.COM

Jason Clark is a bestselling storyteller who writes to reveal the transforming kindness of the love of God. He and his wife, Karen, live in North Carolina with their three children, Madeleine, Ethan, and Eva.

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